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Police Agreement Pretext for Arbitrary Arrests

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the Baliem Customary Council chief, Lemok Mabel (Doc. Jubi)

the Baliem Customary Council chief, Lemok Mabel (Doc. Jubi)

Jayapura, Jubi – The Baliem Customary Council said it considered an agreement between the Police and the community of Lanny Jaya as a pretext to  arrest people arbitarily.

The agreement states that if the armed group commits untowards acts in Lanny Jaya, the community will resist them, but if the people are unable to do so, the army and police will take action.

“It is a kind of a pretext to arrest people randomly, including human right activists or even journalists. That statement only is only for their own interests. The Papua Police is a respected institution, so, we must find another solution,” the Baliem Customary Council chief, Lemok Mabel, told Jubi on Wednesday (8/10).

He said he was not aware of the meeting between the police and the community of Lanny Jaya that was held recently.
“If the meeting was real, then we from the Baliem Customary Council should be involved. So I think it was a lie,” he said.

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He said if it was only the local government involved in the meeting, the agreement is considered invalid.
“It’s not for one or two people, but it applies to the community of Lanny Jaya and its surrounding areas. The statement is superficial,” he said.

Earlier, some media outlets reported that the community of Lanny Jaya made a pledge to protect their area from the armed group in response to a recent shooting incident.

Pledge allegedly involved community leaders, religious leaders, women, youth and customary leaders, legislators, government officials, intellectual figures, sub-district and village chiefs and military and police officers.

Lanny Jaya Regent Befa Yigibalom told reporters that the pledge represented the entire community.
“People should live in peace and safety, and struggle for their better lives day by day. We believe that people will realize their commitment, because security is their responsibility too,” the regent said.

He said all village chiefs should be proactive in informing security personnel and sub-district officials in the event of a security problem. (Arjuna Pademme/rom)

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Papua Teaching Movement runs a literacy program in Tenedagi Village

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Papua Teaching Movement (GPM) has established a ‘Kebada’ learning group in Tenedagi Village, Tigi Barat Sub-district. – IST

Jayapura, Jubi – General Secretary of the Papua Teaching Movement (Gerakan Papua Mengajar/GPM) Orgenes Ukayo said GPM has extended their literacy program to Tenedagi Village, Tigi Barat Sub-district, Deiyai Regency. GPM is a non-profit organisation who run a literacy campaign and provide literacy programs for children in Papua’s remote areas.

According to Ukago, GPM has established the “Kebada” learning group in Tenedagi Village. “Kebada means ‘be opened’. It means everyone can participate in learning and teaching (in this group) to eliminate illiteracy in the Meepago customary area,” said Ukago by phone on Sunday (12/7/2020).

Further, he said the GPM’s volunteers come in the afternoon to teach the first and second-grade pupils. Earlier, GPM established the “Ayago” learning group in Tuguai Village, Paniai regency. “We also run the same program in Waghete Kota Sub-district and adjust the learning schedule with children activities,” he said.

Moreover, he added that the learning groups aim to eliminate illiteracy in the Meepago customary area. “It aims to reduce the drop-out rate among children and to assist children in obtaining a decent education. We believe that they can be as intelligent and advanced as anybody else. The problem is we are indifferent to teaching the young Papuans,” he said.

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Therefore, Ukago said GPM has campaigned and developed the literacy program for children in Papua’s remote areas. “We develop this program for not just helping children on how to read and write but also how to count and deal with digital literacy,” he said.

In the meantime, GPM Chairman Agustinus Kadepa said the organisation was established to provide primary education for indigenous children of Papua. “We extend our program to remote villages so that children in remote areas are not left behind and able to reach their dream,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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The marketing strategy of Papuan woman traders to survive amid the pandemic

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Illustration betel nut seller. – Jubi

Papua, Jubi – The COVID-19 outbreak has emerged a new dilemma for everybody. On the one hand, they should restrict their activities, but on the other hand, they have to work to get income for their families.

A consumer Delia Mallo said she is very concerned about Papuan women traders at Pharaa traditional market in Sentani, Jayapura Regency during the pandemic.

“It’s so sad to see them should go home early while not many people could come to buy their commodities,” Mallo said when shopping in Pharaa Market on Thursday (25/6/2020).

The restriction during the pandemic made the traders go home earlier than usual, and people’s concern about the coronavirus transmission has increasingly impacted on the traders’ income.

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“Since the emergence of COVID-19, I am worried (to stay longer in the market). After buying fish, I immediately go home,” said Mallo.

Because they have to go home early, traders reduce the price of their commodities to prevent substantial loss because of rot.

Tilapia fish, for example, is priced at half of its regular price. The fish harvested from Lake Sentani is usually sold for Rp 80 to 100 thousand per pile, but now sold for only Rp 40 to 50 thousand per pile. Each pile can weigh more than 1 kilogram.

“To be sold, so we just let it go at a low price. The important thing is we can still get money for trading tomorrow,” said Anace Suebu.

Mrs Suebu displayed her fish on a 2 x 3 meters table at the Pharaa Market, and her income has significantly decreased since the COVID-19 pandemic. “I could usually take Rp 1 million a day before the pandemic, but now it’s crushed,” she said.

As a result, she also needs to restrict her purchase. She could no longer be able to buy fish at large quantities. Her income has significantly declined, while she still has to continue spending money for daily needs.

“I told my customers to be patient. I cannot buy fish at large quantities because I don’t have sufficient money,” said the mother of four.

New Dilemma 

The new dilemma that emerged due to the COVID-19 is not only happening to Suebu but also hundreds or even thousands of Papuan woman traders. Their economy has suffered due to the pandemic.

“I used to bake (sell) twenty pieces of bread, but it’s only 15 now for Rp 15 thousand per piece,” said Karolina Fonataba who usually sells bread in the Pharaa Market.

During the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, Fonataba, a woman of Biak Numfor, had moved her business to the former Doyo Baru Market. She did it to cope with the restriction rule applied in Jayapura Regency. Because she lives near the market, she can adjust her trading time. Also, she adds another commodity to sell, namely sago, which she sold for Rp 10 to 20 thousand per piece.

“Relying on the income from selling bread is not enough (for daily needs).”

However, she could not stay longer in the new location and decided to return to the Pharaa Market by selling the same commodities, bread and sago.

“In the former Doyo Baru Market, there were even fewer consumers. It was only 5-10 pieces of bread sold (every day),” told this sixty-five years old woman.

Although she has added the items of her commodities and returned to the Pharaa Market, her income is still far lower than in the usual time. “I could get Rp 150-200 thousand in the past, but now it declines to Rp 50-100 thousand, while a sack of sago usually sold out in three days, but now it takes a week.”

To survive during the pandemic, Fonataba has attempted various ways. “I also deliver (sell) the bread from door to door. The customers can pay whenever they can.”

In the meantime, Mariche also applied a similar strategy of survival during the COVID-19 pandemic. She sells betel nuts at the former Doyo Baru Market. “Although people say the COVID-19 is dangerous, I keep selling. If not, we cannot eat.”

However, Mariche, a woman from Demta, has to deal with her stock purchase to avoid loss. “I used to buy 2-3 sacks, but now it’s reduced. I run out of money, while fewer customers come to buy.”(*)

 

Reporter: Yance Wenda

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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When Persipura fights racism on the field

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Persipura when rehearsing Batu, Malang not long ago. – Jubi/courtesy

Jayapura, Jubi – Sometimes people think that the football competition in Indonesia was free of racism, but it wasn’t, especially during the match or practised before the game.

It was even getting worse when the referee gave a controversial decision that made players explosively emotional.

Persipura former head coach M Raja Isa from Malaysia once warned his players to be cautious during the match when the referee often gave a controversial decision which can trigger players to be emotional and lose concentration on the game.

“Though we always prayed such disruptions often came either from rival teams, supporters or referees,” he told Jubi.co.id.

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And at such times like these, they heard racial slurs come out from those who watched them practice or played in the match.

Coach Isa had told his concerns to Koran Tempo, 22 December 2007 when Persipura had a lousy experience while playing in Balikpapan and Jepara.” The boys couldn’t concentrate on the match because people shouted them ‘monkey’.”

According to him, his players often got racial slurs from supporters that disturbed their concentration.

Another case was experiencing Persipura coach from Brazil Jacksen F Tiago who said the insults to the players and coach of Persipura team must always get rewarded with victory and support from all supporters in Papua. Therefore, he was prancing around when Nelson Alom set a goal for Persipura team to defeat Sriwijaya FC at Jakabaring Stadium amid racism insults and shouts.

In response to racism slurs in the Indonesian football, an Aremania supporter from Depok sent a letter to Tabloid Bola edition Tuesday, 15-22 December 2009 with the title ‘Apologies for Persipura’.

In his letter, he said,” “As a supporter of Aremania, I regretted to see the match coloured with racist shouts from the audience at Kanjuruhan Stadium, Malang…

To all members of Persipura team and their supporters, especially Jayapura residents, I on behalf of Aremania throughout Indonesia sincerely apologise if some Aremania/Aremanita had hurt your feelings,”

Meanwhile, the Chairman of Discipline Commission of Indonesian Liga Board at that time, Hinca Panjaitan, did not give any penalties to the audience because of lack of evidence. However, Persipura player Ortisan Solossa got mad and crushed the stadium’s bench at that time because of this racial slurs, and Persipura should pay a fine for his action.

“We understand they did it to respond to racial slurs from the audience,” said Panjaitan at that time. Consequently, Persipura famously known as Mutiara Hitam, the Black Pearl, must pay a fine of Rp 5 million in the ISL 2009/2010 competition in the match between Persipura versus Arema FC.

Concerning racial slurs, the Organizing Committee of Arema FC Abdul Haris had appealed Arema supporters not to sing racism chants on the match Persipura versus Arema FC held in the sixth week of Liga 1 2018 on Friday (27/4/2018) at Kanjuruhan Stadium, Malang.

Haris admitted that those racial chants often performed every time their team played against Persipura.

It needs a tough mentality

The European League has returned to the game after some break due to the pandemic, but have football supporters stopped their monkey’s shouts?, a columnist from face2face Africa.com criticising racial shouts and chants towards the African players. Have we turned our monkey chants out of the corner? Would we still hear how “strong” but not “smart’ African players should?

It needs a tough mentality for any African or black footballers everywhere in the world to face racial shouts, especially when they get compared to a monkey. Those players had experienced hearing a monkey-like sound to get banana peels thrown in the stadium.

Even former Barcelona striker Samuel Eto from Kamerun should mimic monkey’s walk every time he set a goal on the match. No anger anymore, but humour.

Meanwhile, the England team winger Raheem Sterling also commented on the racism acts during a match versus Montenegro. The 24 years old player experienced racial shouts when the England team played against Montenegro in the Euro 2020 qualification round at Pod Goricom Stadium on Tuesday (23/3/2019).

There was a scream mimicking the monkey’s voice aimed at this black England player. It was not acceptable but still happened today. The racism against black football players gave them patience and a tough mentality to compete on national, regional and international levels. It encourages FIFA to announce that it will fight racism in world football. (*)

 

Reporter: Dominggus Mampioper

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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