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Papuan journalist Angela Papuan: people always get suspicious of us

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Investigative journalism training by Tempo Media and PT. Jujur Bicara. – Jubi/Hengky Yeimo

Makassar, Jubi – Editor-in-Chief of Jubi Koran and jubi.co.id Angela Flassy refers to Papua as a home to protect.

She revealed this analogy in an online discussion on “Papua issues from the perspective of journalists’ organised by Jubi on Wednesday (06/17/2020).

For journalists (primarily indigenous Papuans), according to her, to cover stories of their home is very comfortable but it does not always mean easy.

Multiple groups often suspect journalists in Papua. If they report good things about the government, people turn suspicious of them. Still, if they conversely wrote about the community, the government gets suspicious of them even though journalists must be neutral and cover both sides.

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“But that’s not a problem for me. For us, Papua is not only a place to work but home to protect for the next three years, five years [from now and so on],” said Flassy.

According to her, all Papuans including indigenous Papuan journalists, want Papua always to be peaceful, tranquil and no riot. If Papua is unrest, Papuans cannot go anywhere.

“So, if people accused us of being separatist, what is the reason? This stigma comes around only to silencing people to speak up, mute them,” she said.

Furthermore, she revealed that voicing the truth to the public in a conflict area is tough for journalists as they must stand on their ethic of conduct and journalistic independence. By doing this, it would raise stigma and suspicion from multiple groups of people. However, this is their exam to analyse their independence in addressing these conflicts of interest.

Moreover, Flassy said journalists should be professional in doing their journalistic work and be brave to have different views from the government for the sake of people.

Be a journalist, said Flassy, it is more than writing a journal or the government’s event, like many journalists have done in Papua, and then ignoring many problems occurred in Papuan society.

“I respect my fellow journalists out there (outside of Papua). They can write whatever they want, even on their social media. If I wrote like the way they have done, I cannot imagine what would be going to happen to me,” she said.

In the same forum, Emir Chairulla from Media Indonesia said people could see Papua from many perspectives, not only from the viewpoint of human rights or security.

“it can be the economy, social or other aspects. We can cover Papua from various aspects,” said Emir.

Further, in his view, indigenous Papuans are barely given space in the media. “The critical concept of coverage is it should be cover both sides of the story and be objective in describing the highlighted issue,” he said,

Do not use the perspective of Jakarta in observing Papua

The Jakarta Post editor Evi Mariani in the same discussion stated the national media should put themselves in the perspective of Papua instead of Java or Jakarta when reporting Papua.

And she admitted that as a national based media, the Jakarta Post is sometimes facing difficulty in accessing information related to particular issues of Papua. However, we (editors in the Jakarta Post) are attempting to employ Papua’s perspective properly in our coverage.

“The perspective is very important; therefore, we should go to the field (to cover the issue). But if the perspective still holds to the view of Java or Jakarta, it’s still problematic, though, for example, we conducted an interview directly with a source from Papua,” said Marani.

Therefore, according to her, it would not be comprehensive enough, if in covering Papua, media only take the issue of culture, investment or the natural beauty of Papua. Media needs to tell the stories of Papuans from the perspectives of humanity and of justice.

The online discussion lasted for almost two and a half-hour hosted by a senior Papuan journalist and Director Jubi Victor Mambor featuring other speakers including Emi Chairulah, a journalist from Media Indonesia; Lucky Ireew, Editor in Chief of Cenderawasih Pos; and Arnold Belau, Editor in Chief of Suara Papua. (*)

 

 

Reporter: Arjuna Pademme

Editor: Maizier Pipit

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A story of Zaki, a teacher from Aceh who dedicated his life for education in Intan Jaya (Part 2)

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The late Muhammad Zaki was teaching children how to read in di Intan Jaya Regency, Papua. – Courtesy of Zaki

Nabire, Jubi – “I consider Zaki like my son in my house, and now I lost him,” Oktovianus Malatuni told Jubi in Nabire on Monday, 6 July 2020.

Malatuni is the Head Division of Pedagogy and Educational Staff Development of Intan Jaya Regency, Papua Province.

He said that he has considered that Muhammad Zaki and his fellows under the GPDT program of Gadjah Mada University who came in Intan Jaya since 2016 like his own children.

“They came to my house, and were free to eat, drink, like my own children,” he said. Therefore, when Zaki got ill, Malatuni and Zaki’s friends always took care of him until he died.

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“Because Zaki was the best teacher who always paid great attention to education, especially in Intan Jaya, Papua,” he said.

For this reason, Malatuni admitted he was angry and rude to medical workers in the Nabire Public Hospital where Zaki was treated.

“Because he was my child, and if there was no social restriction, we planned to refer his medical treatment to another hospital with complete facilities in Jayapura or other places. But it does not mean we underestimate the local hospital in Nabire, we just wanted the best for him,” said Malatuni.

Muhammad Zaki arrived in Intan Jaya with other 41 teachers under the GPDT Program of the Gadjah Mada University. Those selected teachers were then assigned to teach in different schools, and Zaki was teaching in Mbiandoga Primary School, Mbiandoga Sub-district.

According to Malatuni, Zaki’s performance was outstanding. Besides training by the Gadjah Mada University and the Education Office of Intan Jaya Regional Government, he also had experience in teaching in Aceh.

Therefore, his previous experience as a teacher, said Malatuni, helped him to assess what aspects need to improve in regards to education in Intan Jaya.

“Besides teaching, he also acted as a school operator, in which he did not need any guidance in implementing his tasks,” said Malatuni.

He further thought that Zaki’s competence had influenced other teachers under a similar program. They were capable of adapting immediately with the local habits and environment. At the end of their contract, all GPDT teachers, including Zaki, submitted their report on their lesson learned during their assignment to the Education Office of Intan Jaya Regency for evaluation.

At the end of their contract in 2018, the Education Office through the Division Head of Pedagogy and Educational Staff Development offered these contract teachers whether they want to return or continue to teach in their school. Zaki did not accept the offer immediately, but at another time, he said he wanted to continue teaching in Intan Jaya. As the division head, Malatuni needed to assure it.

“Zaki said, ‘Bapak, I still want to return to Intan Jaya, but here (Nabire) is my home’,” he said.

Malatuni was happy to hear it because Intan Jaya needs additional teachers, especially the one with good capability like Zaki. Therefore, together with some friends, Zaki decided to stay in Intan Jaya as contract teachers.

“Zaki, I love him. He called me ‘Bapak’ and my wife ‘Mama’. He called me ‘Pak’ only on a formal occasion. He was very tolerant and befriended with everyone disregard their ethnicities, religions, or races, although he was Muslim among majority Christians. He had a good ability to adapt to his surroundings,” said Malatuni.

Zaki was also a hard worker, added Malatuni, who showed his ability through his works. He started with organising school administration to establish a library for children at his school and a literacy group in Intan Jaya.

“It included the library for children “Mbiandoga Cerdas” and a literacy group “Ombo Pustaka” which he worked together with his friends, and book shipping to Intan Jaya. Their work for literacy in Intan Jaya was outstanding,” he said.

What Zaki and his friends have done in Mbiandoga Primary School, said Malatuni, was a great achievement. “Honestly, as the Division Head, with the school principal, other teachers and I, we lost him very much. We will always pray for him to be with God and all the mistakes he made during his life were forgiven,” said Malutuni. He looked sad. (END)

 

Reporter: Titus Ruban

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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A story of Zaki, a teacher from Aceh who dedicated his life for education in remote Intan Jayapura, Papua (Part 1)

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The late Muhammad Zaki took a selfie in front of his school, Mbiandoga Primary School, Mbiandoga Sub-district, Intan Jaya Regency, Papua. – Courtesy of Zaki

Nabire, Jubi – This is a story of Muhammad Zaki, 32 years old, a primary teacher from Aceh who decided to teach children in remote Intan Jaya, Papua.

Zaki died of illness on Monday early morning, 29 June 2020, in Nabire Public Hospital and buried on the same day at Girimulyo Cemetery, Nabire.

“He was a good person and always concerned towards Papuan children in Nabire and Intan Jaya. He always provided reading books and passed them to our community to help children in learning,” told Tri Wahyu Budi Saputra, the chief of Nabire Reading Community (Koname) who admits his loss of a close friend.

He regretted coming late and could only come at the funeral. “I heard he was ill, and then news that he passed away. I am sad because I lost a close friend who cares about Papuan children,” he said.

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In the meantime, a lecturer who studied in the same university with Zaki in Aceh wrote that Zaki once distributed leaflets looking for book donors to donate for children in remote Papua by utilising free book shipping service from the Indonesian Post Office to all over Indonesia.

He was also keen to share his experiences teaching in a remote area with other students while he returned to Aceh.

The man, who was born in Krueng Mane, Aceh Utara Regency, graduated from the Indonesian Language Study Program of the Education and Pedagogy School of Almuslim Peusangan University, Bireun. He then participated in the selection of the Underdeveloped Regions Teaching Program (GPDT) conducted by the Papua task force of the Gadjah Mada University in December 2015. He passed the test and was assigned a two-year contract (2016-2018) to serve in Intan Jaya Regency, Papua Province.

Zaki was a very resilient young teacher who was always willing to work in remote areas despite the lack of facilities for education. Therefore, instead of returning to his hometown in Aceh after the termination of his contract, he decided to stay in Mbiandoga, Intan Jaya Regency as a contract teacher in the Mbiandoga Primary School.

Salamon Edison Pally, a teacher from Alor, Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT), who is currently a contract teacher in Mbiulagi One Roof Secondary College in Jae Village, Wandai Sub-district, Intan Jaya Regency, told that he and other selected teachers under the GPDT Program came to Intan Jaya in December 2015. Although they were under the same program, he was not so close to Zaki and barely met him because they were teaching in a different school. “We know each other. Although we were not close but always greeted each other if we met,” he said.

When their contracts terminated in 2018, both Zaki and Pally decided to continue working as contract teachers in Intan Jaya Regency.

In February 2020, Pally came to Nabire for personal purpose and could not return to his village following restrictions on social activities and transportation due to the COVID-19.

“When I was in Nabire, I heard Zaki was ill. I came to visit him, but he still looked fine,” said Pally.

But his condition gradually dropped in March to April. Feeling sympathy to Zaki who stayed in his relative’s house while the owner was in Aceh, Pally often visited him and advised him to stop smoking. On 26 April 2020, he took Zaki to a clinic in Nabire. While Zaki got medical treatment for six days in this clinic, Pally took care of everything. For the medical expenses, he and some former GPDT fellows collected their money to Rp 7 million.

“I was not close to him, but I sympathised with him because he was all alone. His relatives were returning to Aceh,” said Pally.

When Zaki was allowed to return home, Pally often came to accompany and encourage him to recover soon. “I could not bear to leave him alone with poor condition. So, I always accompanied him,” he said.

At that time, Pally told that Zaki had tears because he did not expect that Pally who was not close to him for almost five years in Papua took care of him.

When his friend’s condition turned worse, Pally took him to the community health centre several times, and then to the Emergency Room of the Nabire Public Hospital on Monday, 22 June 2020. Zaki stayed there for a week and passed away on 29 June 2020.

His friends came to take care of his body with the assistance of nurses and the Division Head of Pedagogy and Educational Staff Development of Intan Jaya Regency Oktovianus Talatuni.

“From the hospital, we deliver the body to Girumulyo Cemetery,” said Pally.

Furthermore, he said Zaki was lucky because he got a foster father and friends in Papua, because he lived alone, far from his family.

Zaki survived a mother in his village, while his close friend in Aceh Syahrul told Jubi by phone that his mother wanted to come to Nabire once she heard the news that her son was in coma in the hospital. However, when she was ahead of Banda Aceh, she received the news that her son already passed away in Nabire.

“His mother will still come to Nabire to visit her son’s grave,” said Syahrul. (*)

 

Reporter: Titus Ruban

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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Papua Teaching Movement runs a literacy program in Tenedagi Village

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Papua Teaching Movement (GPM) has established a ‘Kebada’ learning group in Tenedagi Village, Tigi Barat Sub-district. – IST

Jayapura, Jubi – General Secretary of the Papua Teaching Movement (Gerakan Papua Mengajar/GPM) Orgenes Ukayo said GPM has extended their literacy program to Tenedagi Village, Tigi Barat Sub-district, Deiyai Regency. GPM is a non-profit organisation who run a literacy campaign and provide literacy programs for children in Papua’s remote areas.

According to Ukago, GPM has established the “Kebada” learning group in Tenedagi Village. “Kebada means ‘be opened’. It means everyone can participate in learning and teaching (in this group) to eliminate illiteracy in the Meepago customary area,” said Ukago by phone on Sunday (12/7/2020).

Further, he said the GPM’s volunteers come in the afternoon to teach the first and second-grade pupils. Earlier, GPM established the “Ayago” learning group in Tuguai Village, Paniai regency. “We also run the same program in Waghete Kota Sub-district and adjust the learning schedule with children activities,” he said.

Moreover, he added that the learning groups aim to eliminate illiteracy in the Meepago customary area. “It aims to reduce the drop-out rate among children and to assist children in obtaining a decent education. We believe that they can be as intelligent and advanced as anybody else. The problem is we are indifferent to teaching the young Papuans,” he said.

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Therefore, Ukago said GPM has campaigned and developed the literacy program for children in Papua’s remote areas. “We develop this program for not just helping children on how to read and write but also how to count and deal with digital literacy,” he said.

In the meantime, GPM Chairman Agustinus Kadepa said the organisation was established to provide primary education for indigenous children of Papua. “We extend our program to remote villages so that children in remote areas are not left behind and able to reach their dream,” he said. (*)

 

Reporter: Hengky Yeimo

Editor: Pipit Maizier

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